Posts filed under ‘The Near Future’

Well…we are starting a script the first version of which battles would be the one to spark a world nuclear war.


The first one to mention it in unclassified circles was in the late 1970s, and Putin actually stated he intends to use nuclear weapons against a “minor war, like one with the Ukraine”–he shared the fascination that Trump had and has regarding usage of them.

Prior to that was the realization that a nuclear war might well make humanity extinct because of radiation’s effect on the gene structure. If not extinct, I noted as well that ‘civilization’ [city-based society] would almost undoubtedly disappear and soon after that sapience. The first absolute need for any society is to have means of keeping knowledges of various types, first through repeated chants (poetry theoretically came to being because remembering is easier if kept through repeated chants and easier still if the material is rhymed–there is a vast difference, however between that state and the ability to create semi-permanent records [there is absolutely no record of anything being permanent–entropy is the current most destructive factor–“heat death”–but the trail can easily be followed with only cursory knowledge of history that leads to a realization that our chief knowledge of time is through the degradation of objects, whether living or dead, referring to the Catholic Church’s longstanding prohibition of printing presses (in the 1960s it was noted that European occurences of the “invention of the printing press” happened at least three times, happened during the First Renaissaince, in Italy, somewhere else that was absolutely vulnerable to the Church, and of course at the beginning of, well, The Renaissance. Mind you, the Chinese had their version millenia before that and it’s extremely likely Japan had them a bit over a thousand years prior–somewhere between 400 and 600 A.D.

The point of all that is that language itself as we know it depends on reliable long-term storage. Without it, all but the simplest forms of knowledge would fall by the wayside. A graphic example of this is high school subjects and in particular manipulation of accepted history. I didn’t bother with the quotes.

This is what it means. Within two generations of loss of long-term storage, easily-accessible knowledge, language becomes progressively quicker degradation. Almost all “hard”–tough and comprehensive–knowledge will have disappeared. In the absence of religion, compulsion to follow protocols is basically non-existent except as based on fear. Those two factors alone indicate rapid failure of language as we know it, and the rapid disappearance of “law and order”. And that means losing the ability to use metals above brass and copper. Mind you, there’s the minor problem that by that time the necessary temperatures won’t be achievable other than by parabolic mirrors (just possibly) because all known surface mines for coal no longer exist. Tar is a bit difficult to use as a heating source, and distilling it by means of fractioning is hard without steel. And a few other things are as well, like transparent glass which has a non-wavy surface, tools in general, electrical or petroleum-powered engines, bearings…you know, basically all the things we really couldn’t do without.

A hundred years without that storage nearly ensures that nothing we know as essential will have survived because of the knowledge needed and the lack of ability to ensure its survival. I could go on but it only gets more sickening, especially in light of the fact that catastrophe appears to be both unavoidable and soon to happen. However, there should be surface coal sources appearing right now because of the rise in temperature in particular at the Poles. I’m not going to attempt to announcing anything that isn’t my opinion, because I do attempt to use empirical methods. I don’t know any facts.

And I’m dying relatively rapidly in a lot of pain, mostly due to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (Type 7). That means I can’t pretend to keep up with the questions for me on Quora, although I do attempt to do my best. Mind you, I’m 67, a Vietnam Vet and before that a dependent who for one thing spent a lot of time next to military air fields and then after that was the Rogue Valley, well known for high pollution levels, especially since one of the ‘superhighways’ (I-5) runs through it under a nearly constant atmospheric inversions which trap temperature, pollution and particulate matter. Whidbey Island at the time I left it didn’t have severe pollution problems. Since then the traffic has has at least tripled and the actual travel rate (not the speed limit) has dropped by half, which increases pollution from the given vehicle a lot.

I also lived in Japan for six years. The four years of service during Vietnam I was home-ported on the outskirts of Tokyo, as a dependent there (Japan) the pollution wasn’t nearly as bad; it was very bad six years later. Running out of ability to simply write for hours on end. Pardon me, I ran out of it.

April 9, 2021 at 8:20 pm Leave a comment