Posts tagged ‘methods of knowledge’

About Our Beloved Cell Phones

‘OMG. Who really cares? They’re plastic pieces of crap that dominate our lives anyway. Now they’re dominating our virtual lives and conversation! Machines already rule the world, it’s just like pets; “Look what I just got MY human to do!!”‘

 

My part in a thread where people were arguing intensely about the utter perfection of either Android or Apple phones–cell phones, yes.  It is arguable that we’re seeing the birth of artificial intelligence precisely through the mass interaction with computers that also act in a cloud, just as it’s arguable to say that human intelligence is solely social because it’s maintained through the given language.

 

As for the malice–a bit over 40 years ago; “I hate computers and I hate programmers worse!”  It wasn’t true, but it was and is appropriate.  With the birth of the ‘C’ series, bear in mind that it is difficult to impossible to avoid premade short snippets of logic [truly intrinsic to the statement; see a textbook for an explanation that could be more understandable], one of the reasons for the progression.

 

…Dedicated to Felicity, my 16-year old cat, who…hates computers.  They take far too much attention from her!

September 17, 2017 at 6:02 pm 1 comment

Modal Philosophy

The primary problem I’m facing now is deceptively simple; what are modes?  Combine this with the statement that each occurrence is necessarily unique in some respects, and it becomes obvious that primarily modality is an artifact of a representational system or systems, although it is real in various respects.  It affects action (because it affects perception); modes can be shared (to some extent they have to be, because society per se is a product of shared perceptions which are the products of modes) and have stability.  A repetitive characteristic of modes is the assumption of the norm; what is experienced “now” (variously defined) is what has been and will be.  [Adaptation is the product most of all of pain.]  Modes are absolutely not exclusive.  Exclusive modes are the product of abstraction; Dooyeveert’s choice of “justice” as a mode was perhaps as perfect an example of this as could exist.  Modes as we know them descriptively are lingually-derived.  Experience itself is and must be pre-lingual.  The behaviorists and Freudians both might or might not argue.  If “conscious” experience then is lingual free will in most is arguable.

–Glenn

This is a tiny fragment of what I’ve been muttering about having thought about for forty years.  I’ve finally come to some actual conclusions.  Sort of; my philosophy doesn’t actually allow for absolutes, odd as that may seem.  The true origin lies in the meeting of Aristotle, Plato, Socrates, Luther, and Calvin of all things.  Throw in a little Bible (I did read it three times) and a few other books, plus at least a million words I’ve written (I’ve probably managed to get a thousand published).

September 27, 2008 at 4:12 am Leave a comment